Archive of ‘Current Posts’ category

An introduction to floating your quilt block

A song popped in to my mind the first time I used the Monster Block Maker.  The block was “floating” at the machine and I found myself singing quietly to myself: “It floats through the air with the greatest of ease…”


While it’s certainly novel, you might be wondering, why would you want to float a quilt block?  The answer:  You’ll save fabric and batting!

The Monster Block Maker is designed to work with the 8” x 8” Snap Hoop Monster.  It is available for single needle and multi-needle machines.  The kit includes:

  • 4 reusable plastic templates for 5″, 6″, 7″ and 8″ blocks
  • 60 yards of ¼” wide double stick Monster Block Maker Tape
  • Instructions for how to use the product
  • 12 Downloadable embroidery designs (C2S, PES, JEF formats)

Here’s a look of the product in use:

The photo shows the 5” template attached to the bottom frame of the 8” x 8” Snap Hoop Monster frame.  I’ve been using the template for multiple uses (hence the fibers on the double stick tape).  The tape has enough adhesive to still adhere a few more blocks.  Of course, when the tape has lost it’s stickiness, I can peel it away and apply new strips of tape.

The bottom fabric of my quilt sandwich is adhered to the back (underside) of the Monster Block Maker template as shown.

Next, a piece of batting is adhered to the top of the Monster Block Maker template.

Last, the top fabric for the quilt sandwich is placed on top of the batting.

Note, the magnetic frame from the 8” x 8” Snap Hoop Monster is not used with this product.

Now it’s time for the embroidery machine!  The first stitch sequence secures the fabric.

Now the machine stitches the decorative elements.

The block is complete.  The hoop has been removed from the embroidery machine.

Now just peel away the block from the Monster Block Maker template.

Trim any excess fabric around the block with a ruler and rotary cutter.

 

For more information on the Monster Block Maker visit the Designs in Machine Embroidery website.  Two product links available:  Single Needle Machines and Multi-Needle Machines.

Plus enjoy Free US shipping up to $10 on your purchase of the Monster Block Maker.  Offer expires October 5, 2018.

 

 

 

Machine embroidery is for everyone!

One recent Saturday, I invited my friend, Tore Bellis, to my studio to learn how to machine embroider.  Tore is a software engineer and he’s always interested in learning new things.  It made sense to me that he should learn.

I considered what he might like to stitch and decided for his first experience, he should do more than embroider a piece of fabric. He needs to make and complete a project in one day.

That sounds like an ambitious task but it’s not with the Snazzy Snap Covers. The collection is fun for all skill levels. And given Tore’s analytical mind, I knew he’d enjoy seeing how the project comes together. The pockets would really captivate him!

The collection features 6 different styles of notebooks in two sizes. He chose to stitch the shark design for the small notebook cover.


I offered all my fabrics for Tore to choose from including a new pack of Carnival Batiks I received from the Baby Lock Common Threads event. Tore was a little hesitant to use my special new batiks but there is no better time than the present. I was pretty surprised how much he deliberated over the fabric selections. (This is a sign he’s an embroiderer at heart and perhaps even a quilter!).

He cut the vinyl fabric for the notebook cover, the batiks for the inside pockets and the blue ‘denim’ for the inside cover.


He also made a preliminary selection of thread colors. I assured him he could change his mind as the project came together.

He hooped the stabilizer and attached the hoop to the machine.

I showed him how to thread the Baby Lock Spirit by following all the numbers and arrows on the machine. He also learned how to use the automatic needle threader. The automatic needle threader was his favorite part.

I took photos throughout the process and we decided to capture his very first stitches on video. He practiced the steps before I shot the video. I explained if something goes wrong we can always stage it again and re-shoot. I quickly learned however, he really wanted the video to catch his first stitches— no exceptions. So we practiced the motions a few times until he was ready.


As he stitched, I explained the concept of placement stitches and tackdown stitches.


He stitched his first appliqué and learned about appliqué scissors.

I demonstrated how to use the scissors and suggested he compare them to using regular scissors. But without trying them he could already see the advantage of appliqué scissors. He carefully trimmed the excess appliqué fabric and carefully returned the hoop to the machine.

Tore stitched the next applique fabric – the top portion of the shark.
Then he carefully trimmed away the excess fabric.


The design quickly takes shape!


He continued stitching and we reached a point when difficult decisions would have to be made. What thread color for the fish designs? Tore auditioned several options.


He contemplated the shades of blue.


Tore decided to experiment with a tan color that would pop off the blue vinyl. He’s becoming a professional at threading the machine at this stage of the process.

At this point Tore was ready for the particularly clever part of the construction process: the inside of the notebook cover.

Tore aligned the “denim” fabric with the notches on the back of the design. We used a spray adhesive to hold the fabric in place. Then he stitched the fabric down.

Next, the fancy batik pockets (my favorite part of the design). Tore aligned the pockets with the notches on the design.

He secured the pockets with Painter’s Tape.

He was ready for the final thread color that would secure the pockets and define the shape of his notebook cover. This was the last critical thread color decision to make and he was not hasty. I suggested red since it’s a shark notebook to hint at the idea of blood. I pulled out all my threads (not just red) so he could browse options.

Then I found him at the machine, contemplating which shade of red.
He said, “This one is more ‘blood’ while this is more vivid. Do I want blood or do I want vivid?”

These were important questions only he could answer, of course. He made his decision and finished stitching the design.

He heard the celebratory chime on the Baby Lock that proclaims the design is finished. I pointed out the smiley face on the touch screen of the machine that also indicates the design is complete. (Even though I’ve been embroidering for a few years, I never tire of those features!).

Tore unhooped his masterpiece.

Then he trimmed the notebook to its final shape.


The last step: installing snaps! Among Tore’s many hobbies and talents, he’s installed snaps with his leatherwork projects. But we still practiced our snap skills on a piece of fabric.
And just like that, my friend who has never machine embroidered made his first in-the-hoop project!

Tore went home that night and ordered a six-pack of mini notebooks from Amazon. Now he’s planning his next set of notebooks.



The take-away from this piece:

  • Machine embroidery is for everyone! Share your hobbies with friends and family members. Don’t forget to consider kids or grand-kids. Depending on the child’s age, you can do some of the more involved parts of the task. It’s not only a time to bond but there’s a delightful element of discovery you can enjoy through a novice’s eyes.

Special Limited Time Offer (1 week only!)
Take $10.00 off your order of Snazzy Snap Covers! Use coupon code: snazzysaturday. Visit the Designs in Machine Embroidery website by clicking here.

Blue is the Winner!

Earlier this week, I tallied your votes on your favorite of three pillows. Here’s the rundown:

40 picked blue

22 selected pink

4 went for green

I agree, I think blue pillow is splendid.  I love the designs and the color.  Here’s how I made the layout in Inspiration’s Vintage Embroidery software.

Open a new file and click on the Vintage design icon (circled in purple above). Select the Abstract folder and the Abs_0024_Icon_ design.  Click Ok.  Copy, paste and mirror the design.

Select both designs, copy, paste and mirror vertically.Now, tweak the position of the designs to even the spacing.

Select the Vintage designs icon again to add the center design, ABS_0011_Icon_D.

Change the color to blue and move it to the center of the four designs. Select all four designs, right click and select Group from the drop down menu.

On the keyboard, select all (CTRL A), right click and select Align, Center.  

That’s it!  Now the real fun begins: the embroidery and the hunt for the perfect trim!

Magnetic Hoops

I take magnetic hoops for granted.  I invented them so long ago, I’d have to check the patent to verify the year.  I use them everyday for many embroidery tasks.  So it surprises me when I attend events and meet embroiderers who are not familiar with magnetic hoops.

They’ll ask if they work.  And the answer is, “Absolutely!”

They ask if they’ll harm their machine.  And the answer is, “No!”

They’ll ask what size should they buy.  And the answer is, “Every size available for your machine!”

So let’s dig a little deeper.  Magnetic hoops work like a dream because they do not cause fiber distortion. They have a flat metal bottom frame and a flat magnetic top.  The magnets are quite strong and firmly grip a quilt sandwich, a terry towel, a knit shirt and many other fabrics.  They do not replace a standard embroidery hoop, they complement it!

Magnetic hoops do not harm your machine as the magnetic force is shielded by the metal frame.  The magnetic force grips the fabric – not the machine.  The hoops have been thoroughly tested on all machines during the prototype stage.  There has never been an issue with a magnetic hoop interfering with the machine’s operating system.  Many years ago, we were told not to use magnetic pin cushions.  At that time, the computer in the machine was encased in a light plastic housing and magnets could interfere with the operating system. In you owned a cell phone in that era, it was housed in a tote bag with long coiled wire!

Today, the machine’s computer, although very powerful, is tiny. It’s highly insulated and the magnetic force can reach it.  Think about the power of your cellphone, the advancements in embroidery technology are very similar.

So what size should an embroiderer buy? I always ask, ” What size hoop do you stitch the majority of your embroidery projects in?”

Whatever the answer is, that’s the first magnetic hoop size they should purchase.

Now if someone is starting to quilt with their embroidery machine, then the answer is, the largest hoop that’s available for your machine!

What’s Your Favorite?

Just a quick blog post today since I’m buried in new projects.  I’ve been working in Inspirations’ Vintage Embroidery Software and designed three different groupings.  One is supposed to be a pillow but I’m having trouble deciding which one.  I need your help but first, a little background on these on-trend stitches.

Vintage Embroidery software has hundreds of built-in designs that have been digitized to give an old world charm to your embroidery.  The designs require a mixture of 15 wt. polyester and 40 wt. polyester thread. This unique combo gives a high-end retail look to your stitches.  They’re so much fun to stitch because the designs are all low-stitch count designs in a minimum of colors so they stitch quick.  With my busy schedule, I’m always looking for fast and easy with big results.  Vintage fits that bill.

Before I proceed any further on this project, I thought I’d ask you – my fellow expert embroiderers – what’s your favorite grouping?  Do you like the pink Vintage design Abs_0213_Ornamental_D?

 

The green Vintage design Abs_0259_Icon_D?

 

Or the blue Vintage design Abs_0024_Icon_D.?

 

Sometimes, I fall in love with all the samples and then, well, pillows become quilts. So help me stay on track and select one.  Your vote counts!

My Block Piecer Block of the Month: Block 9 – Around the Block Software Instructions

My Block Piecer
Block of the Month : Block 9 Around the Block
Software Instructions
By Nancy Stansbury

This ongoing Block of the Month series was designed to inspire you to learn new techniques using My Block Piecer.  As a reminder, the first Saturday of every month will feature the software lesson using My Block Piecer.  The following Wednesday will feature the sewing lesson.

  • You are free to adapt the block to a size of your preference.
  • A free trial of My Block Piecer is available if you’d like to try it before you buy it.  Note the “Save” feature is deactivated until the software is purchased.
  • Interested in learning more about My Block Piecer and other Inspirations Software?  Join us at an Inspirations Event.  Click the Events link for events near you.
  • If you’re late to the Block of the Month “party” have no fear!  Start with Block 9.

Let’s continue the journey of learning and creativity!


  1. Open MBP.
  2. Click on Create a New Design.
  3. If the units for the ruler on the design page show mm, Right Click on either one of the rulers on the Design Page, and Click on Inches.
  4. Right Click on either ruler again and click on Grid Settings.
    1. Check marks by:
      1. Maintain aspect ratio.
      2. Snap to grid.
    2. Set Horizontal spacing to 0.25.
    3. Click OK.
  5. Click on the Block Icon.

    1. Enter Around the Block #2 in the Find box at the bottom of the window (DO NOT CLICK THE ENTER KEY).
    2. Click on the Down green arrow.
    3. Click OK to place the block on the design page.
  6. In the Properties Window on the right side of the screen click on the Transform icon.
    1. Have Maintain aspect ratio checked.
    2. Change the Width to 6.
    3. Click Apply.
  7. Click on the Reorder icon.
    1. Click on each patch as numbered below. Do not need to number the lower row as it is identical to the first row and just rotated 180 degrees.
    2. Right Click to end the numbering. The numbers will disappear but the numbering is still there.
  8. Click on the Select icon and draw a box around the top row (patches 1 through 7).
  9. Click on the Workflow icon.

    1. Select a 200mm x 200 mm hoop or similar for your machine.
    2. Click the Auto Build button. The patches are in more than one unit, so the embroidery needs to be manually created.
    3. Right Click in the window on the right side (with the numbers) and Click Reset.
    4. Holding down the CTRL Key, Click on the 1 and 2.

      1. Right Click and Group.
      2. Holding down the CTRL Key, Click on unit and 3.
      3. Right click and group.
      4. Repeat ii and iii for patches 4 – 6.
      5. DO NOT CLICK AND GROUP THE LAST NUMBER.
  10. Click Preview.
  11. Click Save.
    1. Click on Create a New Folder icon and name it Block 10.
    2. Double Click on the folder to open it.
    3. In the File name box enter Around_The_BlockA.
    4. Save as type select Inspiration Series (C2S).
    5. Click Save.
    6. A window will open showing you the files that have been created.
      1. Around_The_BlockA_001.c2s.
      2. Around_The_BlockA _artwork.c2s.
      3. Around_The_BlockA _preview.pdf.
    7. Close the file window.
    8. Close the Save window.
  12. Click on the Select icon and draw a box the patches 8-13.
  13. Click on the Workflow icon.

    1. The numbers have been changed to 1-6.
    2. Click the Auto Build button. If there is only one unit go to Step 14.
    3. Right Click in the window on the right side (with the numbers) and Click Reset.
    4. Holding down the CTRL Key, Click on the 1 and 2.
      1. Right Click and Group.
      2. Holding down the CTRL Key, Click on unit and 3.
      3. Right click and group.
      4. Repeat ii and iii for patch 4 and 5.
      5. DO NOT CLICK AND GROUP THE LAST NUMBER.
      6. Go to Step 15.
  14. Click Sort Numbers.
    1. Click Yes to update piece numbers.
  15. Click Preview.
  16. Click Save.
    1. In the File name box enter Around_The_BlockB.
    2. Save as type select Inspiration Series (C2S).
    3. Click Save.
    4. A window will open showing you the files that have been created.
      1. Around_The_BlockB_001.c2s.
      2. Around_The_BlockB _artwork.c2s.
      3. Around_The_BlockB _preview.pdf.
    5. Close the file window.
    6. Close the Save window.
  17. Click on the Select icon and draw a box the patches 14-18.
  18. Click on the Workflow icon.

    1. The numbers have been changed to 1-5.
    2. Click the Auto Build button.
    3. Click Sort numbers.
    4. Click Yes to update piece numbers.
  19. Click Preview.
  20. Click Save.
    1. In the File name box enter Around_The_BlockC.
    2. Save as type select Inspiration Series (C2S).
    3. Click Save.
    4. A window will open showing you the files that have been created.
      1. Around_The_BlockC_001.c2s.
      2. Around_The_BlockC _artwork.c2s.
      3. Around_The_BlockC _preview.pdf.
    5. Close the file window.
    6. Close the Save window.
  21. Click the Select icon and draw a box around the entire block.
  22. Click the Cutter icon.

    1. Seam allowance default is .25”. Normally I change this to 0.4” or 0.5”, to make it easier to place the fabric pieces no matter which output format I choose.
    2. How you are going create the fabric pieces for the block, will determine which file format (hoop) to choose for the templates.
      1. If going to print the templates, and use them to manually cut the fabric pieces, select the Paper Letter 210×279.
      2. If going to use the Scan and Cut, select Brother SCN 12x12”.
    3. If going to use the Silhouette, select Silhouette 12x12”.Can Unclick Optimize Orientation if using a directional fabric (This will optimize how the pieces file on the paper.)
    4. Click Apply.
    5. Click Save.
      1. In File name enter Around_The_Block Templates.
      2. Click Save and select the proper format for your cutting device.
      3. The Following Files have been created.
        1. Around_The_Block templates.
        2. Around_The_Block templates_preview.pdf.
      4. Close the files window.
      5. Close the Cutter window.
  23. Click on Create a New Design.Note: When using the Merge to open a file, SAVE is actually a SAVE AS and the original file is not overwritten.
  24. Click on the Hoop icon and choose a 200mmx200mm or similar hoop for your machine.
  25. Click File, Merge.
    1. Locate the file. Around_The_BlockA_001.c2s.
    2. Move to top of hoop.
    3. Click Copy, Paste.
    4. In the Properties window.
      1. Click on Transform tab and rotate 180 degrees.
      2. Click Apply.
    5. Move to the bottom of the hoop.
    6. Click File, Merge.
    7. Locate the file Around_The_BlockB_001.c2s.
    8. Move to middle and left side of the hoop.
    9. Click File, Merge.
    10. Locate the file Around_The_BlockC_001.c2s.
    11. Place on the right in the middle of the hoop.
  26. Stitch all placement stitches at one time.
    1. CTRL-A or draw a box around all of the designs.
    2. Click UnGroup.
    3. In the Sequence Window move the second set of placement stitches up to the top of the window.

    4. Repeat for the other two sets of placement stitches.
  27. Click File, Save As.
    1. In the name field enter Around_The_Block.
    2. In the Save as type select the format for your specific machine.
    3. Click Save.
  28. Print the templates, or prepare your fabric and send the templates to your cutter.
  29. Load the design/designs onto your machine stitch the pieces for the block.
  30. Manually sew the pieces together to make the block.

 

My Block Piecer Block of the Month: Block 9 – Around the Block Sewing Instructions

My Block Piecer
Block of the Month: Block 9 Around the Block
Sewing Instructions

Block 9, Around the Block, is a four-unit block in the My Block Piecer Sampler Block of the Month. As you know, My Block Piecer splits some blocks into smaller units when a patch shares seam allowances with more than one patch. We’ll piece each of the four units in the hoop. Then the units will be removed from the hoop and sewn together on the sewing machine with ¼” seam allowance. In the software instructions for Block 9, we merged the four separate units into one embroidery design and combined the placement guides for each of the four units into the first color of the merged design.

Hoop tear-away stabilizer in a large hoop. Retrieve the merged Block 9 Around the Block design on the machine. Stitch color 1, the placement guides for all four units.

Place patch 1 fabric, right side up, over patch 1.Stitch color 2, the tackdown.

Place patch 2 fabric, right side down, over patch 1, aligning the raw edges. Stitch color 3, the seam of patch 1 and 2.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 4, the tackdown.

Place patch 3 fabric, right side down, over patches 1 and 2, aligning the raw edges. Stitch color 5, the seam of patches 1, 2 and 3.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 6, the tackdown.

Place patch 4 fabric, right side down over patch 1. Stitch color 7, the seam.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 8, the tackdown

Place patch 5 fabric, right side down, over patches 1 and 4, aligning the raw edges. Stitch color 9, the seam of patches 1, 4 and 5.

Flip patch 5 open and stitch color 10, the tackdown.

Place patch 6 fabric, right side down, over patches 2 and 4. Stitch color 11, the seam.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 12, the tackdown.

Place patch 1 fabric, right side up, over patch 1, in the next unit (top of the block in my design). Stitch color 13, the tackdown.

Place patch 2 fabric of unit 2, right side down, over patch 1, aligning the raw edges. Stitch color 14, the seam of patches 1 and 2.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 15, the tackdown.

Place patch 3 fabric of unit 2, right side down over patch 1 and 2. Stitch color 16, the seam.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 17, the tackdown.

Place patch 4 fabric of unit 2, right side down, over patch 3, aligning the raw edges. Stitch color 18, the seam of patches 3 and 4.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 19, the tackdown.

Place patch 5 fabric of unit 2, right side down, over patch 1, aligning the raw edges. Stitch color 20, the seam of patches 1 and 5.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 21, the tackdown.

Place patch 6 fabric of unit 2, right side down, over patches 1 and 5, aligning the raw edges. Stitch color 22, the seam of patches 1, 5 and 6.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 23, the tackdown.

Place patch 7 fabric, right side down, over patch 6, aligning the raw edges. Stitch color 24, the seam.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 25, the tackdown. Unit 2 is complete.

Place patch 1 fabric of unit 3, right side up over patch 1. Stitch color 26, the tackdown.

Repeat the steps above to complete unit 3.

Place patch 1 fabric of unit 4, right side up over patch 1. Stitch color 39, the tackdown.

Place patch 2 fabric of unit 4, right side down, over patch 1, aligning the raw edges. Stitch color 40, the seam of patches 1 and 2.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 41, the tackdown. Place patch 3 fabric of unit 4, right side up over patch 1 and 2. Stitch color 42, the seam.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 43, the tackdown.

Place patch 4 fabric of unit 4, right side down, over patch 1, aligning the raw edges. Stitch color 44, the seam of patches 1 and 4.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 45, the tackdown.

Place patch 5 fabric of unit 4, right side down, over patches 1 and 4, aligning the raw edges. Stitch color 46, the seam of patches 1, 4 and 5.

Flip the patch open and finger press the seam. Stitch color 47, the tackdown.

Remove the block from the hoop. Trim the units on the outer stitched line.

Sew the units together at the sewing machine.

Created by Nancy Stansbury

Instant Applique

Make an applique design in an instant in Inspirations’ Perfect Embroidery Pro (PEP) or My Quilt Embellisher. Start with a fabric that features a simple shape, like a leaf.  Take a close up photo of the fabric with a ruler in the image and load it as a backdrop in PEP.  Click on the arrow under the backdrop symbol to open the backdrop tools.  Define the Horizon by dragging the mouse across a straight part of the fabric, shown here by the orange line.

Then, define the scale. Drag the mouse 1″ along the ruler and then enter 1″ into the menu that appears.

Now, use the Pen tool to trace around the leaf.

Select the artwork, right click and convert to Applique.

Add some more details with the pen tool. 

And there you have it – so easy in Perfect Embroidery Pro.

Lettering Like the Pros

If you want to get lettering like the pros, you need software that gives you multiple font options, the ability to kern letters, change line spacing, density and column widths.  Inspirations Perfect Embroidery Pro most certainly answers that call.

But if you want to put a stylized effect on your lettering with just a few clicks and instead of getting a master’s degree in digitizing (oh, I wish there was such a thing!), then Inspirations Word Art in Stitches is your answer.

Let’s look at the popular golf brand, Titleist.  Their logo is a simple, classy script but it’s enhanced by the addition of embroidery foam under the stitches.  If you visit their website, https://www.titleist.com/golf-gear/golf-headwear you’ll notice how all of Titleist’s catalog images are shot from an angle to highlight the dimension of the embroidered logo.  That adds serious wow factor to a traditional cap and sport!

In Word Art & Stitches, dimensional text is just a click away.  Whatch how easy it is. Select the Puffy text tool.

Type the word in the message box and boom – there’s your dimensional text.

This is such a popular technique that we teach it in our Stitch Lab events and everyone masters puffy text on their first try.

After teaching how to make it in the software, students learn how to stabilize and stitch the lettering on a pet bandana.  Everyone of those pet bandanas are sent to a local animal shelter.  Talk about a win-win!  Students learn and the shelter gains a customized bandana for their adoption days.

Check the calendar at InspiredbyDime.com https://www.inspiredbydime.com/inspiration-socials/  to see if a Stitch Lab is coming to your area.  You can fill out the form on that page to be notified when one is coming up in your region.  Hope to see you there!

 

 

 

The Formula for Embroidery Fun & Success

Stitch Lab, the formula for embroidery fun and success, debuted last weekend in Dublin, Ohio!  What a blast, I’m so glad I attended.  Inspirations consultant Ashley Jones led the 2-day hands-on event  for 72 embroidery enthusiasts. Our host, Quilt Beginnings, was a delight – boy, do they know how to treat their customers.

I met so many old acquaintances and friended new ones. We stitched 6 unique projects and everyone learned something new.  Even the ladies who told me they’ve been stitching since the first embroidery machines were available, learned some new tricks.  That shouldn’t have been a surprise to me because every class or event I attend, I always learn something new!

Look at some of the fun we had. 

After all that stitching, Kathy Daum, Quilt Beginnings owner and customer cheerleader, donated all of the projects made in class to a local charity – a women’s shelter that helps countless women and children in the Columbus, OH area.  We stitched items for home, mom, baby and pets.

But the best part, all attendees took home a kit to stitch at home on their own machine.  I hope you’ll consider attending a Stitch Lab this year.  I’m heading to several Stitch Lab events this fall, scattered all over the country.  I’ll release the schedule soon and maybe you can join me at an event in your town.

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