Archive of ‘Lettering’ category

A Reader Suggested…

Yes, I’m still talking about the wedding! I’ve had so many people ask for details about the, well, the wedding details, I thought I’d keep you in the loop.  Although I didn’t actually embroider the wedding gown lace, I did add some very personal touches to the dress.  I thought long and hard about documenting the ceremony on the inside of the dress. I even asked you to leave a comment and tell me what you would do. My final decision was to add a label at the waistline and an embroidered ribbon to the lining’s hem.

I made several attempts at the label, starting with a traditional slant of the bride and groom’s names, date and location of the wedding.  I didn’t like this at all – the J’s were overlapping and the digits overwhelmed the letters.LabelSS6BL

Making a label is not really that big of a deal unless you think about how it will be read in 20, 30 or more years down the road. It was Janelle’s day, not mine, so I wanted the focus of the message to be on her. And I kept coming back to your suggestions. One of you –  Ruth Peterson – left a beautiful suggestion on July 24. It stayed with me for weeks so I decided to use it. Thank you, Ruth, for your suggestion.

For the next version I switched the font to one of Inspirations’ Perfect Embroidery Pro’s mini fonts – Diana Small. I typed each line of Ruth’s poem on a separate line and hit Apply. LabelSS3BL

I loved what appeared. I quickly did a test stitch out, switching the needle to 65 and the thread to a 50 wt.LabelSS2BL

I didn’t have to make any changes to the text but I did want the label to be finished on all edges. So I went back into the software and selected the Artwork tool and a rectangle. LabelSS4BL

I drew a rectangle around the lettering and selected the rectangle. I right clicked on the rectangle and selected Convert to Run. LabelSS8

When the Properties Box appeared,   I selected Two-ply from the Run menu and reduced the stitch length from the 3.0 default to 2.2. I changed the color to 2 so that the machine would stop after stitching the poem. LabelSS9BL

I hooped a fresh piece of the Bemberg rayon lining and stitched color 1, the text. I placed another piece of the rayon on top of the text and stitched color 2, the outline.  Once removed from the hoop, I trimmed the edges, slit the back and turned it right side out.  And then low and behold, I found a hand needle and actually sewed it to the dress! LabelSS10BL

Check back on Wednesday to see why another addition to the label made it so very special to not only Janelle but the whole Roche family.

Software Saturday – Kindergarten Rocks!

In today’s lesson, I’ll demonstrate how to create the special requested Kindergarten Rocks embroidery layout.  If you missed part 1 of the series from Monday, you can read it here: Part 1 of Kindergarten Rocks

Open Perfect Embroidery Pro (PEP) software and select the “T” for text tool in the upper left hand of screen. Type the word “Kindergarten” and select the “Kids” font from the font drop down menu. Click “Apply”.

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Click the “T” for text again and type the word “Rocks!” in the text box. Select the “Pepita” font from the menu and click Apply. Move the word down to fit underneath Kindergarten and size accordingly.

Click the “T” again for the text tool and type the words “Class of 2028” in the text box. Locate the Geometric font from the font choices and click Apply.  Position the text centered underneath “Rocks”.

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Go to the drop down menu at the top left upper screen and click “File” Click2Stitch from the drop down choices. Click2Stitch will offer an option box in the center on the screen where you can select the fabric. Under type of fabric select “knit light” (onsie, t-shirt).

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Click “Next” and “Finish”. The Click2Stitch automatically adjusts the density for the fabric selected and recalculates the stitches.  It also recommends stabilizer and pre-washing if needed. You have the option to print the steps if desired.

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Select the 5″ x 7″ hoop.

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For the step by step directions on proper design placement and hooping techniques for this project refer to the Multi-needle Monday Blog titled: Kindergarten Rocks!


Editing Text in Perfect Embroidery Pro

A few weeks ago, blog reader Jenny left a comment on the June 27th post. She asked, “Can you please help me figure out how to “Edit” what I had “Grouped” together? I am not able to ungroup the design as was once before? I have to keep typing the poem up every-time I want to change the name on the stitch out.”

At the time, I responded with this, “Jenny, select the design, right mouse click and choose Ungroup from the drop down menu. There are also Group and Ungroup icons on the top tool bar but I can’t load an image here into comments to show you. Oh, I just realized you mentioned a poem – so that’s a little different. Again, click on the Select tool, select the poem, right mouse click and select Breakup Text from the drop down menu.”

I can do a more thorough job of explaining the process and give more options for editing text. Since the only information I have Jenny is what she stated above, I’ll start from scratch with a recipe. Follow along with me. Open a new page in Inspirations’ Perfect Embroidery Pro. Click on the Text icon. The cursor changes to an A and the Properties Box opens. Select your font. I’ve chose Arial Small. Type a fictional recipe into the Properties Box, then click Apply. Text1

With the Text tool still selected, change the justification to Left Alignment. Click Apply. Notice all of the editing features available on the text itself. You can move individual letters, whole words and lines. Text2

When the Select Tool is used, your options diminish. You can size the design (the software sees it as a design and not text when the Select Tool is used), rotate, mirror image, duplicate, etc. But you do not have the freedom to edit the individual letters. Text3

Click on the Text tool again, and all of your text editing options appear. I’ve readjusted the kerning on the word chips. Text5

When I click on the Select tool again, my changes are there. Text6

Save the design now in C2S – the native format of Perfect Embroidery. Change the color of the thread to green and save it as Chips.pes. Close both designs.

Open Chips.pes. The design is no longer recognized by the software as text – it’s just an ordinary design. When you click on a letter, the sequence field now shows all of the individual elements of the design – runs and satins. Ugh – that’s very challenging to edit. Text7

Not to worry, you have the original file. Open it and you’ll find the software recognizes it as text and all of your editing abilities are right at your finger tips! Text8

For instance, you can increase the 5 cups to 6 cups in the Properties box.. Text9

This is a great example of why it’s so important to save the original file in C2S and a working copy in your machine format. Make your changes to the original and you’ll always have the ability to edit.



You are invited to go crazy quilting!

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Sam Solomon, our Creative Director at Designs in Machine Embroidery has been telling me to experiment with crazy quilting.  I’ve admired Eileen’s projects in her book, Today’s Crazy Quilting with Your Embroidery Machine but I didn’t think I had the skill level to understand what fabric to fold, where and when.  I remember taking a test in the 6th grade on spatial skills and paper folding and I struggled.  So clearly, crazy quilting isn’t for me.  But Sam assured me I could do it.  I intended to prove him wrong.
I decided to experiment with the 5 inch version of Quilt Block 1 from Today’s Crazy Quilting with Your Embroidery Machine.  I kept it simple by creating an unadorned quilt block using the embroidery techniques highlighted in the book.  I was shocked by how easy it was to do the flip and stitch method described in the book.
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About the block:
Since the block was plain (and boring) I decided it was the ideal canvas for ribbons and other embellishments.  I never thought I’d get to use the spades and clubs embellishments on a project.  Victory!


Next I made the same block but added embroidery designs from the book.  Blissful success!

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About the block:
It was important to me I set some rules during this entire crazy quilt block making process.  I only wanted to use 3 thread colors.  I embraced the concept of white and pink birds and am quite pleased with the results.  I added a decorative zig-zag stitch to attach the gray ribbon.


Two successes in one afternoon proved a confidence builder. Why stop now?  I decided to incorporate embroidery designs from Perfect Embroidery Pro. I used the mini fonts and the circle path for text. More success!

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About the block:
The bicycle is a built-in design in Perfect Embroidery Pro.  I arched the word “Create” around the wheel.  What a simple, yet fun way to display text!

The hot air balloon is also a built-in design in Perfect Embroidery Pro.  I arched the text, “up, up and away we go!”  It wasn’t until the machine started stitching did I realize I had trapped myself.  What color do I stitch the word “go”?  I had to get creative on the fly—so I stopped the machine and stitched the “o” in white.  Not ideal but it’s a crazy quilt!

The footprints are also a built-in design in Perfect Embroidery Pro.  You can add as few or as many footprints as you want.  Just remember to mirror image them!


Next I used the bee, flower border and hearts from Today’s Crazy Quilting with Your Embroidery Machine.  I like crazy quilting as a style because it’s like doodling on a textbook book cover or an acceptable way to add graffiti. It seemed fitting to add text, “Denise was here!”

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About the block:
I used Perfect Embroidery Pro to add “Bee-utiful” and arched it around the bee.


Start thinking of favorite phrases, important dates like birthdays or anniversaries— and add them to your crazy quilt blocks.  Since I was stitching these blocks in March, I figured why not add the date.  It’s a momentous month, the month I tried my hand at crazy quilting with an embroidery machine.

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About the block:
The eye is a built-in design from Perfect Embroidery Pro.  It was quirky and fun—the ideal addition to my crazy quilt blocks.  The large flower button covers a mistake.  No one but me… and you know!  That’s the joy of crazy quilting.  You can easily cover up mistakes.  Tiny baby buttons adorn the polka dot pink fabric.


Next, I did a Google search on crazy quilting and noticed a recurring theme:  spiders and spider webs.  It turns out they are considered a sign of good luck.  I don’t believe in luck but I do like spiders and spider webs.  Finally, I get to incorporate a creepy crawly spider into my embroidery!

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About the block:
I used Perfect Embroidery Pro to draw one strand of the spider web, then I copied, pasted and enlarged the strand as the arch got wider and wider.  Next I converted the artwork to a running stitch with a 2.5 mm stitch length.  I hand stitched my Halloween spider.  (I tried my faithful hot glue gun, but the rubber spider wouldn’t stay.)  I think this block makes a statement!

The other embroidery designs on this block are free design downloads courtesy of our friends from Embroidery Online.  You can find these designs (and more!) by visiting the Designs Plus Newsletter. All embroidery designs are archived for your convenience and creative whim!

My lessons to you:

  1. If you want to improve your embroidery skills you need to practice. A great way to practice is by stitching a crazy quilt block!  Look at each block as a canvas to decorate.  Use it as your own small and manageable art piece.  Once you experience success, who knows how many blocks you might stitch!
  2. I only used Block 1 to keep my variation to a minimum—but imagine the possibilities! They are endless.  Use the embroidery designs included in the book to embellish the blocks.  But don’t stop there.  Get creative and resourceful.  Use your embroidery software.  Use the free embroidery designs we offer on our website.  Use built-in embroidery designs on your machine.  Get scrappy.  Get creative.  Go crazy!

Now’s a great time to purchase Today’s Crazy Quilting with Your Embroidery Machine.  Not just because it’s wildly fun and a great skill-building experience – it’s on special!  For a limited time, enjoy free shipping on U.S. orders.  Plus, Eileen will autograph the book, which is always such a nice personal touch.  Visit the Designs in Machine Embroidery website to redeem the offer.


Here’s your assignment this week:

I’m fortunate to have friends and coworkers that challenge me to try new things – like crazy quilting.  Who in your life pushes you to be your best and try new things?  What activities have they encouraged you to try that you discovered you loved?  Post your comments and one random winner will be selected to win a $25 gift certificate to the Designs in Machine Embroidery website.
The winners of last week’s assignment answered the following question:When you get a new embroidery design how do you test it? Change Fabrics? Change Threads? Or both? 4 random names will be drawn and will each receive a $25 gift certificate to BFC Creations! The winners are: Kim – “Test it on the same fabric if possible.”, Carol M. – ” To test designs I use felt, scrap denim or scraps of solid fabric I keep beside my embroidery machine. Most of the time I just say a prayer and do the design on my project. I do test thread colors with my software before I do the design to see which color I like best.”, Belinda G – “I rarely test a design, I haven’t had a problem yet! Just lucky, I guess! but I usually choose other colors than what is in the design.”, and Barbara M. – “I do most of my color testing in my software. Then I can fine-tune it on a stitch-out. Sometimes I just trust the software…”BFC Creations


All You Need to Know About Lettering in Perfect Embroidery Pro

One of the mottos that I live by is using time well. Let’s face it, we all try to cram as much into a day as possible. So when I have a choice about how to spend my time, I want to learn something. If I learn one thing when I read a book, take a class or watch a webinar on machine embroidery, then I consider it a good investment in my time. I imagine you feel the same way about your time.

If you watched Tuesday’s webinar by Katherine Artines, I’m sure you learned more than one thing about lettering in Inspiration’s Perfect Embroidery Pro. Here are some of my favorites:

Why mini fonts look best when stitched with a 60 wt. thread in a #9 needle.2015-02-21_13-28-18

The shortcut to view all of the available characters in a special font.2015-02-21_11-03-47

More than one way to access and view the over 200 fonts that included in Perfect Embroidery Pro.2015-02-21_11-02-18

An attractive alternative to override split satins when enlarging fonts into jumbo letters. You have to watch the webinar to see how easy it is to make this switch from a satin:2015-02-21_10-46-49

to a fancy fill:2015-02-21_10-46-03

How to emphasis the meaning of the stitched word.2015-02-21_14-07-55

Witness the morphing of a single line of text into an inviting expression.2015-02-21_13-53-18

Learn the secret to better envelopes.2015-02-21_13-50-20

See the trick to perfectly flanked motifs in arced lettering.2015-02-21_14-06-39

And you’ll be intrigued by Katherine’s creativity when she explains how each of these fun designs are created in Perfect Embroidery Pro.2015-02-21_10-52-05

Watching this video is time well spent. Click here to view the webinar.


Multi-Needle Monday! Roulette Table Cover!

If you are using your multi-needle embroidery machine for a hobby or as a business, I’m sure you have some interesting and unique requests. Through my ten years as a commercial embroidery business owner I have had my share—believe me!

Recently one of the interior decorators that I embroider for asked me to meet their client who had remodeled his living room into a small casino room. The man was widowed and decided to change his formal living room (which he never sat in during his 25 years in the home) into a real casino room; complete with a regulation size roulette table!

The roulette table has an unusual shape and the table cover was customized to fit in one direction. One end of the table is narrower than the opposite end; therefore after playing and replacing the table cover (which is 15 feet long) it was difficult to know which end would fit properly. The client suggested I embroider a monogram on the one end of the cover and then he could easily tell how to replace it on the table.  Easy enough!

Yikes….the table cost thousands of dollars and the custom cover was hundreds as well. The fabric was a medium weight vinyl and he wanted a six inch tall monogram in gold metallic thread. We decided on the font (Old English) and placement which I carefully marked with masking tape while still on the roulette table. I also took photographs with my phone so I could easily envision the layout when I returned to my workroom.

Steps to success:

  1. I used PAL2 to precisely plan the embroidery layout. In my workroom, I placed the cover on the floor and attached the PAL2 to a small table at one end. I used masking tape (not painters tape because it would not stick to the vinyl) I did not want to use pins or chalk. I measured the distance from the edge seam; which we decided while on location and checked for accuracy.
    Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog
  2. The best hoop for this heavy fabric was the 8”x 8” Snap Hoop Monster. I was concerned about marks from the frame so I placed foam wrap on the bottom of the frame on top of the magnets.Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog Eileen's Machine Embroidery BlogI used medium weight cut away stabilizer.   I attached the hoop to the machine and placed the bulk of the table cover on a chair to ease the movement of the hoop.
    Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog
  1. The metallic thread was placed on my counter, not on the spool rack, in a small mesh container I use for other notions. I have read many different tricks to working with metallic thread but this trick works for me 99% of the time. (Wish I had those odds when playing on a roulette table!)Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog
  2. I slowed the speed of the embroidery machine down to 700rpm and embroidered the monogram without a hitch!Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

As a business owner, it is not wise to play “embroidery roulette” on such custom items because of the risks involved.  This is no time to “learn” or “experiment” on the job – the costs are very high.  I try to steer clear of embroidering on items that I do not supply but I was confident that I had the most amazing tools, embroidery technology and experience.  When you’re in a similar situation consider your experience and the risks involved.

My client was thrilled when we placed the cover on the table and he now enjoys taking the cover off and replacing.


Last minute thoughtful holiday gifts!

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In the middle of summer my friend and I went hiking at Lost Maples State Park.  We’ve hiked before but neither of us realized what we were getting into.  The walk was difficult from the start.  I tried to distract myself by admiring the rocks.  They were pretty white rocks!

We walked for several hours before reaching a stopping point.  My friend asked if I wanted to take the same trail back or continue toward new territory.

I detested the thought of walking back.  Moving forward seemed logical.

But then the terrain changed.  Steep inclines.  Vultures were circling us.  I wondered if they spotted dinner.  My friend rallied and encouraged me.  He kept telling me I’ve trained for this – it’s just like the stairmaster at the gym.

We made it up the incline.  But the trek down was worse.  I turned silent.  I began praying.  Not even in English— I pulled out Latin prayers from my memory.  I was afraid.  I wondered if I’d reach the point of despair.

The trek was cruel—with loose rocks covering the entire incline down.  I hung on to branches to prevent slipping and falling.

My friend helped me along by testing the steeper rocks and making sure I stepped on firm rocks.  I wondered if we’d end up in the news.

We reached what I thought was the end of the trail and I ravenously ate my rationed chocolate granola bar—not caring that chocolate was probably all over my face.  (I’m usually very fastidious).  But the trail wasn’t over yet.  We walked through a creek then reached some shade before finally reaching the car.  I lay on the parking lot pavement—grateful and exhausted.

Somewhere along that trek I coined a new name for the trail.  Quicksand Mountain.  The name doesn’t make sense but in my delirious, panicked condition, the name stuck.

That day on Quicksand Mountain is my reference point.  If I can survive that day I can do anything.  My friend and I made it through—learning valuable lessons and having a great story to share.

That’s why I decided to make this gift for him for Christmas.  It’s simple yet has a lot if meaning.

I encourage you to stitch a simple, yet thoughtful gift for a friend or family member.  No one but you and the recipient may understand its meaning— but that makes it all the more special and unique!

The block was made in My Quilt Embellisher—but your thoughtful creation can be made using any software.  Choose your own message and design to make it a personal gift.  Follow the steps below to get an understanding of your software then create your own version.

In this article you’ll learn:

  • How to convert artwork to embroidery stitches
  • How to incorporate lettering and quilting stitches using the Outline feature.



Open My Quilt Embellisher.  Click on the Select Block icon on the top Tool bar.

Click on Basic Quilt Blocks.  Then select Peaky & Spike.  I chose the 8” x 8” block size but you can change to whatever size suits your needs.

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With the block selected, click the Transform tab and click Flip Vertical.  Note that the entire quilt block is just artwork right now.  The next steps will convert it to stitches.

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Click on the Red Triangle.  Click on the Convert to Run icon.

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Click the Text icon to add text.  I chose to do 4 individual lines of text because I wanted the most freedom. The first two lines of text are the Arial font.  The third line, “Quicksand” is the Mini Lancer Script.  I thought it captured the look and feel of quicksand well.  The 4th line, “Mountain” is the Arial font.  I chose to italicize it to enhance the ominous look and feel.

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Next I chose the Arial 4mm font to type additional messages for the ‘side’ of the mountain.  Then I rotated the text to align with the side of the triangle.  Message 1:  “Let’s go to Quicksand Mountain!”

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I repeated this step for the other ‘side’ of the mountain. Message 2:  “It’s just like the stairmaster!”

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I added the year to the ‘peak’ of the mountain, using the same Arial 4mm font.

The last step is to convert the rest of the artwork to stitches.  But you’ll want the stitches to work around the text.

Select both lines of text as shown in the diagram.  Right click and select Group.

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Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Right click again.  Select Create Outline.

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A window will appear.  Keep the defaults and select Ok.

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An outline will appear around the text.  This outline is Artwork only—there are no embroidery stitches.

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Select all the Artwork images.

Click the Combine icon.

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With the Artwork still selected, click the Stipple icon to convert the area to stitches.

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Your embroidery design should look like the image below.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Finish the block by color sorting.  Then save the embroidery design and send to your machine.

Purchase a frame and trim the fabric to fit.


Not only do you have a one of a kind gift unavailable from any department store – but you’ve spent a moment learning your embroidery software!


Here’s your assignment this week:
What memories do you have that you could convert to stitches?  Post your comment and one lucky winner will win a copy of Calligraphy Project Designers! Good Luck!
The winner of last week’s assignment answered the following question…One of these things is not like the other. Spot what’s different in the photo above? Two random comments will be chosen to receive $50 gift certificates at Stunning Stitches! Good luck.SS_DME-Banner-CertificateAnd the answer we were looking for and the two winners: Sandy P and Joyce F – barefoot lady!




My Most Rewarding Embroidery Task

J5Yesterday, I had the honor of embroidering my daughter’s white coat for her graduation ceremony at University of Texas, Pan American. Janelle has completed her Master’s degree and will be a certified Physician’s Assistant.

It’s been a long journey. Her path included several semesters spent in a cadaver lab during her undergraduate studies where her passion for medicine was ignited. That was followed by intense study to pass the GREs. Sweating out the application process (50 available seats for 1000 applicants) and then waiting for the acceptance letter.  The jubilation that her goals were within reach pushed her into the next phase: twenty-seven months immersed in medical studies – orthopedics, cardiology, obstetrics, gynecology, internal and pediatrics. Testing, testing, testing and finally, clinical rotations in the field. Last week, she passed her final exams with flying colors. Today, she graduates and will wear her white coat – monogrammed by her mom.

My life is a whirlwind often swirling so fast it’s hard to catch my breath. On Wednesday, Janelle brought me the white coat, fresh out of the shipping bag and asked me to embroider her name and credentials above the left pocket. She was kind enough to write it out for me first (and smart enough – maybe because she remembered just a few months ago when I embroidered linens for her friend’s wedding gift with the bride’s maiden initials! They look just great on my bed now). She dropped the coat (and her significant other’s) in my office and we went on to other tasks.

The next day, I looked at the pristine coat, tags still attached and thought about how hard it was to earn that coat. The sacrifices she made along the way and the sacrifices I made to get her through undergraduate school at the University of Oklahoma. As a single mom, I was determined to see both of my children graduate with a bachelor’s degree. It wasn’t easy but they both have succeeded.

Janelle did graduate school on her own and is now empowered to enjoy a career she loves. If she’s as lucky as me, she’ll never work a day in her life because she’ll love what she’s doing.

So, it was with great honor that I opened Perfect Embroidery Pro and clicked on the Text icon. I typed in Janelle Roche….in the properties box and scrolled through the fonts to the mini fonts.J7


I selected the Diana font and hit Apply.j1

Suddenly, there it was on the screen – all those years of preparation. I couldn’t wait to see it stitched.

I measured the pocket – 5” wide and adjusted the size of the text. I hooped tear-away stabilizer and similar fabric and stitched a test. Perfect!

I placed a target ruler above the pocket and inserted a target sticker into the hole. J3

I hooped the coat with tear-away stabilizer in Snap Hoop Monster, centered the needle over the sticker and pressed start. I have to confess, I stayed with the machine and watched it stitched every letter. I didn’t really relax until the machine stopped. Those mini-fonts in Perfect Embroidery Pro are perfect!J4

After clipping the thread tails and removing the stabilizer, I fingered the white cloth and experienced a little déjà vu remembering another white coat – her baptismal gown. Oh, how time flies.


Janelle and Kegan Milstead Graduation Day University of Texas, Pan Am, 2014

Words of Wisdom!

As machine embroiderers we have opportunities to use our machines to create and embellish everything from clothing to quilts to home décor and more. Sometimes my motivation to begin a project gets stunted by the fear of failure. That’s right… failure before I’ve even taken the first stitch… or even selected the fabric for the project-to-be.

But one recent afternoon I decided to play with the Calligraphy Project Designer. I like it because it’s simple to use and feeds my need for creativity.

I decided to do an online search for a fun quote. You can easily search key terms like “popular quotations,” “famous quotations,” or even “quotations about <life>,” (you can replace the word “life” with any word you want.)

In my search I came upon a fun quotation from Albert Einstein: “A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.”

What an inspiring quotation!

Before beginning the project, here are some tips to keep in mind:

  1. Select the hoop size. This will give you boundaries to work within.
  2. If you are working with a long phrase, break it into several individual designs. It makes it easier to manipulate and rearrange.
  3. The <Enter> key is useful. Instead of having one long continuous line of text, break it up by using the <Enter> key.
  4. Consider the alignment. I chose to center all my text.
  5. You may decide to edit as you go or wait until you have all the text on the screen. I chose to make the more creative edits (enlarging and changing the angle of the letters) at the very end. Decide what works for you.

The point is – you need to experiment with the layout. That is part of the creative process!

Here are the steps I used to put the layout together in software.

  1. Open the Calligraphy Project Designer Software.
  2. I chose the largest hoop size my machine could handle.
  3. Click on the Text tool to add text.Design 1: “A person <Enter key> “who never”I centered the design and chose Old English for the text style.Design 2: “made a”I centered the design and chose Old English for the text style.Design 3: “mistake”I centered the design and chose Jester Pro for the text style.

    Design 4: “never tried”

    I centered the design and chose Old English.

    Design 5: “anything”

    I centered the design and chose Old English.

    Design 5: “new”

    I centered the design and chose the Diana-Vs text style.

    Design 6: “Albert Einstein”

    I centered the design and chose Old English. I placed the text further down on the page as I wanted to add a design later.

  4. Rearrange the text into a pleasing format.
  5. Click the Ink Spots button and select the Ink Blotch design. Arrange the design in a pleasing format. Enlarge the design if necessary, by selecting it then dragging one of the corners to expand the size.
  6. I decided to enlarge the first letter “A”. Click on the text icon. Click on Design 1 to select it.
  7. Click on the center of the letter “A”. The letter will now be surrounded by a yellow box.Grab one of the white corner boxes to enlarge the design. Once enlarged, click on the center of the letter and rearrange as needed.
  8. I wanted to have fun with the word “mistake.” I decided to rotate the letter “t”.
    Click on the Text button. Click on the word “mistake” to select it. Click on the center of the letter “t” to select it. Click the arrow to rotate.Click on the sizing box to enlarge the letter.

Final Tips:

  • Rearrange the designs as necessary and experiment with font styles and thread colors.
  • Stitch efficiently! Go to Edit. Click on Resequence by Color.
  • Save the design as an MHF file. (This format is the native format in the software. It will enable you to make edits in the future.). Then save the design in the format your embroidery machine reads and send to your embroidery machine.

Here’s your assignment this week:

We love words of wisdom!  They can inspire, make us smile and motivate!  Share your favorite quote — whether it’s from someone famous, a family member or some pearl of wisdom you tell your children or grandchildren.  We want to know!  One random comment will be selected to win a $25 shopping spree to the Designs in Machine Embroidery website.

The winner of last week’s assignment answered the following question… 

Everyone wants to know what Elfis said to Elfira to make her giggle for the cover shot.  Post a comment with your best guess.  One random comment will be selected to win a one year subscription to Designs in Machine Embroidery Magazine!

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

The random drawing winner is… Shauna Kaminsky!  “That silly shelf elf wishes he looked this good!”

Thank you everyone for the laughs!  We enjoyed reading the comments!

It’s Sew Easy TV: Monograms for Men

ISE 703-2 PIC 1

On October 10, log onto and watch me show you how to make any men’s garment distinctive and personal by adding a monogram in episode 703.  The key work is discretion to assure great results. I’ll discuss the variety of types and shapes available for monograming, and show how to perfectly position the garment in the hoop before you start to embroider.  Then, I’ll create the monogram on the screen of the Quattro® 3 NV6750D by selecting the font from the built-in lettering and resizing and moving the letters.  Check out how to use the snowman sticker to assure the pocket flap is perfectly positioned.


If there’s one word to describe monogramming on menswear, it’s discreet; discreet in size and contrast. Now don’t go by my samples – my samples are done for photography – highly contrasting so you can see them well on camera. But when stitched for someone to actually wear, a discreet monogram is the one most gentlemen will be comfortable wearing. You have several choices when it comes to placing the monogram. Some very popular choices are on the pocket, above the pocket, or on the pocket flap if there is one, on the left cuff, inside the placket between the second and third button or on the placket at the bottom, just below the last button on the top placket and just for identification purposes: inside the collar. ill There are countless ways to arrange the letters but I’ve focused on three versions of the three-letter monogram. The traditional diamond shape: first name initial, last name initial and middle name initial. The two outer letters are proportionally smaller than the middle letter. Diamond The standard order: first, middle and last initial – all the same size. Standard On the pocket flap, go for a contemporary approach with the first initial stacked over the middle initial. This ‘tower’ of letters is equal in size to the last initial. Take this approach when the garment is a casual shirt like flannel, worn every day. Contemp Let’s take a look at how you do it.

Pocket Flap

Find the vertical center of the flap. Place a target sticker just right of the edge of the flap. Hoop sticky stabilizer and place the hoop under the Perfect Alignment Laser. Turn on the laser and center the hoop under the laser. Position the flap on the sticky stabilizer. Smooth the flap on the stabilizer making sure the shirt is not caught under the flap. Flap1 Support the weight of the shirt while transporting the hoop to the machine. Attach the hoop on the machine and verify the needle is centered over the target sticker. Remove the sticker and embroider the monogram.


Button the left cuff and place it on a flat surface. Cuff2 Place the Perfect Placement Kit Cuff template on the cuff, aligning the fold with the template fold line and the topstitching line with the topstitching. Slide a target sticker under the template – use A for sizes small and medium and B for Large and extra-large. Cuff Unbutton the sleeve and pull the sleeve inside out. Hoop adhesive stabilizer and center the hoop under the Perfect Alignment Laser. Slide the cuff under the beam, aligning the crosshairs. Attach the hoop to the machine and embroider the monogram. These small precise monograms take under three minutes to stitch – you could do a whole closetful in an afternoon!

Here’s your assignment this week:

What is your most prized monogram project? Tell us your favorite and one comment will be chosen to receive a $25 gift certificate to spend on the DIME website. Thank you for reading and good luck!


The winner of last week’s assignment is:

What foot do you have that you wish you knew how to use?  Post a comment to let us know! One comment will be chosen at random to receive a $25 shopping spree on the Designs in Machine Embroidery website!

And the winners is..Barbara. “Gee, I wish I knew where to start! Between my sewing machine and serger, there are so many adventures afoot that I can’t begin to choose! How about the ones that came with the last update?”

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