Archive of ‘Lettering’ category

Upscale Bed Linens

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

I love embroidered bed linens. They are such a treat to slide between as you end a long day. Here are some tips for stitching gorgeous machine embroidery designs on sheets.

Tips for Success

• Take the time to prepare the design and the sheets. It’s well worth the effort.

• Purchase an extra pillowcase to test the design before stitching on the sheets.

• Open the band before embroidering to hide the wrong side of the embroidery.

• My stabilizer of choice for sheets is fusible polymesh cut-away stabilizer with a layer of tear-away floating under the hoop. Fine linens are a tight weave and benefit from a strong foundation for the embroidery.

• Insert a new, sharp needle.

• Consider adding a single-letter monogram to the center of the band. Then stitch from the center to the edge on each side.

• Allow some space at each end of the border for some breathing room (aka – room for error).

Here’s a case for prewashing the sheets. Normally, I don’t prewash blanks but sheets really benefit from this prep step. It eliminates the unwanted puckers that often appear after laundering embroidered linens.

Measure the band – from folded edge to stitch line and from selvedge to selvedge. If the band measures 4” (a common size), select a design that is 3” in height so that there will be ½” open space on each side of the design. Once you select a machine embroidery design that is 3” tall, make a note of its length. My design is 3” x 5” and my queen top sheet measures 90” from selvedge to selvedge. I’ll divide 90” by 5”. I’ll need 18 repeats to fill the band.

Hmm…90” is perfectly divided by 5 into 18 repeats. Frankly, that scares me because I’ll have to be absolutely perfect on placement for each of the 18 designs. So I’ll take a little artistic license here and set myself up for success by planning on stitching only 17 repeats. Not only will this relieve some stress, it will probably look more pleasing because the center of a design will be dead center on the band and not the join of two designs. Definitely more desirable in my opinion.

Not that I know how many repeats I’ll need, I will take a seam ripper to the band and release the hem. I know, reverse sewing but it’s so worth it. Next, it’s time to carefully press the band but I will leave the crease of the fold in place because it’s a built-in guideline for squaring the band (sheet) in the hoop.

Cut the fusible polymesh stabilizer into 4” strips and press it to the wrong side of the band.

Fold the sheet in half, selvedge to selvedge to find the center and place a target sticker to mark the center.

Print two templates of the design. Place one template on the target sticker. Make sure the template’s crosshair is aligned with the target sticker’s crosshair. Use a ruler to verify the design is flanked by ½” on each side (from fold crease to hemline).

Select a hoop that will accommodate the design – one or two repeats. Hoop the band with tear-away stabilizer. Center the needle over the target sticker and embroider the design. Place the template on the band, connecting the image to the stitched design. Move the needle to the template’s crosshair. Remove the template and embroider the design.

When it’s time to rehoop, use the template and folded crease to square the sheet in the hoop and continue to fill the band with embroidery.

 

Here’s your assignment this week:

Can you find the hidden hearts in this image? Tell us how many hidden hearts you see and one lucky winner will be chosen randomly to receive $25 off at the DIME website. Happy heart hunting!

The winner of last week’s assignment is:

Take a look around at the new website and let us know what you think. Leave your comments below and one random comment will be selected to receive a $25 gift certficate to spend on the new DIME website!

And the winner is…Carolyn H. “Very nice! It looks quite modern.”

We’re So Proud!

WP-BlogHeader

Toot, toot!  Beep, beep! A special digital issue of Designs in Machine Embroidery is free for you – just click here to access. You’ll find projects, free embroidery designs, videos from our sponsors and access to leading companies in the embroidery industry.

Wondering what’s inside? It’s packed with educational material for newbies, intermediate and advanced embroiderers. Devour the expert information on stabilizers and how to embroider on ribbon, polos and t-shirts! Learn to create continuous embroidery with confidence; stitch a little something for the man in your life and develop your designer’s eye – all in this one special issue!

WP-What

Download the familiar .zip file, unzip and inside you’ll find an exciting interactive Adobe Acrobat PDF file you can read and enjoy from the convenience of your desktop computer or laptop. Use the free Adobe Acrobat reader to achieve full interactivity and flip through the pages, zoom in on projects and print whatever you’d like. Use the arrows on your keyboard to navigate through the pages: advance by clicking the arrows pointing down or right while the arrows pointing up or left will take you to a previous page.

WP-IconWP-PlayLook for the mouse icon and click on it to activate the zoom feature and more.  View the embedded videos by clicking the play button and enjoy.

We made it simple to navigate, easy to view and inspirational to read – I think you’ll see why we’re so proud of our new digital issue. My hat is off to the whole Designs team for making this happen – led by Sam Solomon, Denise Holguin, Stephanie Smith and Sandy Griggs. Designs wouldn’t be here without that team – they’re awesome! I think you’ll agree when you see what they’ve created.

A very special thank you to our valued sponsors: Brother, Embrilliance, Embroidery Library, Five Star Fonts, Janome America, HoopSisters, SWAKembroidery and Urban Threads –  Enjoy!

Here’s your assignment this week:

Download our FREE digital edition of Designs in Machine Embroidery magazine. Give it a read and enjoy all of the interactivity, photo zooming abilities, videos and beautiful photography captured for each stunning project. Then, come back and leave us a comment on what you think about it – good or bad, we can take it. One lucky reader will win a gift certificate to Designs in Machine Embroidery for $25!

You can use that $25 to buy anything on our website including a 1 year subscription to our print magazine offered at the special price of $24.97 for a limited time only.

The winner of last week’s assignment is:

Go over and give Craftsy a looksy! Tell us what classes interest you or if you’ve already taken a class on Craftsy – tell us what you love about it. One lucky reader will receive a link for a complimentary download of Eileen’s new class, The Machine Embroidered T-Shirt!

Craftsy

And the winner is…“I’ve been checking out Craftsy website, and some of the free classes. My sister told me about this site, she had taken a class and loved it! I would really LOVE to win the chance to take the T-shirt class. I have a fear to try new things, but I’m sure taking the class would give me more confidence. Thanks for sharing your embroidery expertise.” – Jane B.

Congratulations Jane, we hope you enjoy your class and share your experience with us!

Upscale Bed Linens – Tips for stitching gorgeous machine embroidery designs on sheets

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

I love embroidered bed linens. They are such a treat to slide between as you end a long day. Here are some tips for stitching gorgeous machine embroidery designs on sheets.

Tips for Success

• Take the time to prepare the design and the sheets. It’s well worth the effort.

• Purchase an extra pillowcase to test the design before stitching on the sheets.

• Open the band before embroidering to hide the wrong side of the embroidery.

• My stabilizer of choice for sheets is fusible polymesh cut-away stabilizer with a layer of tear-away floating under the hoop. Fine linens are a tight weave and benefit from a strong foundation for the embroidery.

• Insert a new, sharp needle.

• Consider adding a single-letter monogram to the center of the band. Then stitch from the center to the edge on each side.

• Allow some space at each end of the border for some breathing room (aka – room for error).

Here’s a case for prewashing the sheets. Normally, I don’t prewash blanks but sheets really benefit from this prep step. It eliminates the unwanted puckers that often appear after laundering embroidered linens.

Measure the band – from folded edge to stitch line and from selvedge to selvedge. If the band measures 4” (a common size), select a design that is 3” in height so that there will be ½” open space on each side of the design. Once you select a machine embroidery design that is 3” tall, make a note of its length. My design is 3” x 5” and my queen top sheet measures 90” from selvedge to selvedge. I’ll divide 90” by 5”. I’ll need 18 repeats to fill the band.

Hmm…90” is perfectly divided by 5 into 18 repeats. Frankly, that scares me because I’ll have to be absolutely perfect on placement for each of the 18 designs. So I’ll take a little artistic license here and set myself up for success by planning on stitching only 17 repeats. Not only will this relieve some stress, it will probably look more pleasing because the center of a design will be dead center on the band and not the join of two designs. Definitely more desirable in my opinion.

Not that I know how many repeats I’ll need, I will take a seam ripper to the band and release the hem. I know, reverse sewing but it’s so worth it. Next, it’s time to carefully press the band but I will leave the crease of the fold in place because it’s a built-in guideline for squaring the band (sheet) in the hoop.

Cut the fusible polymesh stabilizer into 4” strips and press it to the wrong side of the band.

Fold the sheet in half, selvedge to selvedge to find the center and place a target sticker to mark the center.

Print two templates of the design. Place one template on the target sticker. Make sure the template’s crosshair is aligned with the target sticker’s crosshair. Use a ruler to verify the design is flanked by ½” on each side (from fold crease to hemline).

Select a hoop that will accommodate the design – one or two repeats. Hoop the band with tear-away stabilizer. Center the needle over the target sticker and embroider the design. Place the template on the band, connecting the image to the stitched design. Move the needle to the template’s crosshair. Remove the template and embroider the design.

When it’s time to rehoop, use the template and folded crease to square the sheet in the hoop and continue to fill the band with embroidery.

Here’s your assignment this week:

With Christmas fast approaching travel plans are in full swing. One important aspect of travel planning is packing. If you forget one key thing it can send you in a tailspin! Leave a comment below about the most memorable item you’ve ever left behind and you could win an autographed copy of The Travel Gear Made Easy Bundle by Mary Mulari. In it you’ll learn how to create fifteen new clever and usable travel accessories for trips around the corner or the world. Using Mary’s easy-to-follow instructions and hand drawn illustrations you’ll make travel gear for yourself or family and friends.

Mary Mulari Travel Gear Bundle

The winner of last week’s assignment is:

At EmbroideryOnline.com, you can choose from more than 40,000 professionally digitized and downloadable stock/licensed designs, premium embroidery card/CD/USB Stick collections, embroidery software applications and hardware, a rainbow of thread, glitz and other embroidery supplies 24 hours a day.

Post your comment about your favorite OESD item and one lucky winner will be randomly selected to win a $100 gift certificate for downloadable designs at EmbroideryOnline.com.

OESD

The lucky winner is… (drum roll please!) “Love this tutorial, awesome for decor or gift. I love using the OESD stabilizers. I really like the Christmas designs best! anything for the holidays. ” – Sue

Congratulations Sue!

Machine Embroidered Wedding Touches

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

As tempting as it was to go overboard, I limited myself to make just one machine-embroidered element for my recent wedding: the table numbers.  In retrospect, I’m not so sure anyone noticed that the numbers were embroidered but that’s okay with me. I enjoyed the process.

Since our wedding took place in a natural stone setting (limestone floor, stucco walls, etc) I felt the table numbers and name cards should have an ‘old world’ feel.  So I used ink and water to age basic card stock tags and embroiderable paper. I had a blast doing that – I like to get my hands dirty so this was right up my alley!  First, I used two colors of Distress Ink (tea and coffee colors).

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

I just dabbed the tea ink pad over the tag and then followed with the darker coffee ink.  Then I quickly swiped a wet paper towel across the tag to blend the smudges.  They dried flat and smooth!

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

The next step was how to display the name tags.  I found a very affordable wire dress form with circular details and used it to hold (and transport) the name tags. Once I inserted the name tags in the dress form circles, I slid a large plastic trash bag over the dress form and tied it on the bottom. It kept everything in order for the big day.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

I applied the same ink technique to the embroiderable paper (The Sewphisticated Stitcher) but didn’t get the same results. That paper quickly absorbed all the ink so the blending wasn’t as smooth as I would have liked. It seemed to call for another layer of ink. So I added a spray of paper ink.  The result? A slightly mottled paper.  Now for the embroidery.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

I used open, airy digits from Urban Threads (http://www.urbanthreads.com) I found I could fit two table number tents on each 8 ½” x 11” piece of embroiderable paper. I used a target ruler to mark the position for each letter and gently placed a target sticker in that location.  Too much adhesive might have harmed the paper but a soft touch did the trick.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

I placed the bottom frame of my 4” x 4” Snap-Hoop on the machine.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Then I slid the paper under the needle, aligning the target sticker with the needle. I used the edge of the paper as a guide to make sure the paper was square on the hoop.  Then I snapped magnets onto the frame.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

I could have used the top magnetic frame of Snap-Hoop but I found just dropping the magnets (from my Magna-Hoop Jumbo) was much easier in this application.  Once I removed the target sticker, I embroidered the number.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

I repeated this for each number, rotating the number for the other side of the tent.

After completing the four numbers, I cut the paper, folded the strips and used double-sided tape to hold them together at the bottom.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

As it turned out, the table numbers weren’t the only embroidered items.  My dear friend Mary Mulari brought vintage wedding hankies for each female guest!  What a generous offer.  Many were embroidered (mostly by hand) – all were gorgeous.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

My Stitching Sister, Marie Zinno, surprised with me an embroidered table runner for the unity candle table.  A treasured memento!

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Personal touches are what make a wedding day an expression of a couple’s love.  When family members pitch in to do some of the prep – it makes for some wonderful memories. Since I have five sisters who are capable of pulling off anything, I knew we could handle doing our own flowers. So we did – centerpieces, bridal bouquets, boutonnières, and wall decorations.  I imported the flowers from South America and had them delivered two days before the wedding.  I captured two of my sisters, Marie Zinno and Kath Brown, to do the actual arranging in my garage the day before the wedding.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

The groom and I hauled the flowers to the location a few hours before the wedding and then an army of family joined forces to transform the barren space. I knew I could count on another sister, Liz Scully, for her museum-quality bow-tying expertise.  Really, this woman would win a Martha Stewart bow-tying throw-down. I supplied the pretty ribbon and she made it look perfect! Here are four my sisters (from left to right): Liz Scully, Kath Brown, Marie Zinno, me and Mary Pat Palombo during set-up.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

And after.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

My oldest sister, Mary Pat Palombo, jumped into action and was a valuable set of hands.  My cousin, Pat Mulligan, climbed a 12 ft. ladder to help engineer the hanging of a 30-ft. baby’s breath/tulle garland.  Height is no issue for Patrick since he’s used to having his head in the clouds as a captain with American Airlines.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

It was a magical day.

 

This week’ assignment:

I need your help selecting a new design to feature in an upcoming project. So tell me, do you like design A, B or C? We’ll pick a random winner to receive a Magna-Hoop! Wow – you could win – just leave your comment!


Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog



The winner of last week’s assignment answered the question:

Tell me what is your ‘go-to gift’ for bridal showers? Post a comment and we’ll select TWO random winners to win a $35 gift voucher courtesy of Designs by Hope Yoder!

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

This week’s TWO lucky winners are…
Winner 1:  Sharon Aiken
“I like to make an embroidered ring bearer pillow with fsl and the couple’s monogram as well as an embroidered small satin purse for the bride to carry to the church with her essentials for last minute touch-ups.”

Winner 2:  Nancy Stringer
“My favorite gift for a bridal shower is handmade linen napkins, embroidered with something specific to the couple…something they couldn’t just buy.”

Congratulations Sharon and Nancy!

Special Program!

It’s Sew Easy is a unique how-to television program. You won’t find a host – instead, a selection of industry experts share their top tips with you. It’s an in-depth personal sewing/embroidery/quilting lesson in your own home.

Watch a special viewing of episode 105 of It’s Sew Easy at http://www.itsseweasytv.com. It will begin airing at noon EST on April 27th and be available for viewing for ONE week only. You’ll see my exclusive tips for monogramming napkins and towels which include speedy tips for embroidering multiples. And you can catch Tricia Waddell and Katrina Loving demonstrating how to use needle-turn appliqué on pillows and wall hangings. Finally, Pam Damour wraps up the show with 10 steps to the perfect pillow. Click here to watch It’s Sew Easy!

Content in this feed is © Copyright 2012 by Eileen Roche and may not be republished without written permission. You’re welcome to forward to a friend or colleague but it’s not okay to add the RSS feed automatically as content on a blog or other website.

 

7 Ordinary Towels – One Fabulous Gift Part 1 of 2

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Vintage Elegance

Elevate a humble days-of-the-week towel set with charming embroidery, ruffled trim and ribbon.  The fun is in the making – truly – I had a blast working on this set of towels.  Hidden in a drawer for ages, the days-of-the-week towels popped into my mind just as I was scrambling for the perfect bridal shower gift for a young, kitchen-comfortable bride!

The bride, my niece Kim, has been an avid cook since she first learned how to make homemade pasta at the ripe old age of 8. And she’s got an arsenal full of kitchen equipment. So it’s natural I thought of her kitchen –and the joy she derives from cooking up concoctions in there when I wondered what gift I would give.

These towels are as charming as Kim. A multi-talented, humorous, intelligent woman, no plain-Jane simple terrycloth towels for her. Oh no, her towels need to make a statement – to shout to the world, this kitchen and cook are fun-loving serious foodies.

It started with adorable embroidery designs. A touch of vintage elegance, the utensil designs were snatched at http://www.emblibrary.com.  The collection name is “A Classic Kitchenware Design Pack.  I opened each one in Floriani software and had a bit of fun with the lettering. Did you know lettering doesn’t have to sit on a straight line? You can curve it, bend it, shape it any way you want.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

My next post will give you the step-by-step instructions for adding the ruffles and ribbon. For now, let’s concentrate on the embroidery. Before you get started, take my advice and buy the ribbon to match the towels, then select the fabrics and finally the thread for the embroidery.  Finding the right ribbon was the biggest challenge – it’s easier to match everything to the ribbon instead of hunting for the perfect shade of ¾” wide ribbon.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

In a nutshell, here are the steps. Buy the towels. Find the ribbon. Design the embroidery. Select the fabrics. Select the threads. Prewash the fabrics and towels (if you have the time). Stitch all embroidery. Make the ruffles. Sew the ruffles to each towel. Finish with the ribbon.

Measure the width of the towels. One third of that measurement is the limit for the width of each embroidery design. After creating the personalized embroidery designs, size them for the towels.

Open Embroidery Library design F8031 in Floriani software.  Size the design to the appropriate width.  Click on the Text icon and select the Diana-Vs font.  Type Celebrate! in the text window, click Apply.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Place the cursor over the center green circle and pull the circle down towards the spoon.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

The text will curve. You can adjust the curve by sliding the circle.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Save the design.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Let’s step it up a bit by adding three words – Stir with Love.  Open design F8029 and write Stir in the text box.  Now grab the green square on the lower right corner. Pull the square down towards the whisk.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Enter ‘with’ in the text box.  Place the cursor over each yellow square to move the individual letters closer together.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Pull the green circle in the bottom center down towards the whisk.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Nestle the word just above the stem of the whisk.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Enter ‘Love’ in the text box and click Apply. Select the ‘L’ by clicking on the yellow square in the L. Move the letter to the left. Select the green circle on the upper right corner and rotate the L so that the base is parallel with the whisk’s handle.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Move and rotate each individual letter so that they connect and wrap along the top of the handle.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Save the design.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Make seven different designs and have fun with the sayings. Keep the gift recipient in mind and personalize, personalize, personalize!

Now that the designs are ready, mark the embroidery placement on each towel.  I used the Hand Towel with Border template from the Perfect Towel Kit. Slide a target sticker into each hole.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Hoop the towels in a 5” x 7” hoop with tear-away stabilizer and center the needle over the target sticker.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Remove the target sticker and embroider the design.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Press the towels on a fluffy terrycloth towel, pressing from the wrong side.  Set them aside for now. We’ll work on the ruffles and ribbon on this Friday’s blog post!

This week’s assignment:

Tell me what is your ‘go-to gift’ for bridal showers?  Post a comment and we’ll select TWO random winners to win a $35 gift voucher courtesy of Designs by Hope Yoder!

The winner of last week’s assignment answered the question:

If you were to create fabric fortune cookies for an upcoming event, tell us what the event would be and share one question you would include in the fabric cookies. One random comment will be drawn and the lucky winner will receive a $25 shopping spree on the Designs in Machine embroidery website.

The winner is…Patty C.
What a great idea. Wished I had known of it 2 weeks ago when we hosted my husband’s 60th birthday party. Instead we played a version of Jeopardy. Categories were segments of his 60 years of life…Early years, Golden years, Grindstone, etc. We had fun but the fortune cookies would have worked great with our family.

Content in this feed is © Copyright 2012 by Eileen Roche and may not be republished without written permission. You’re welcome to forward to a friend or colleague but it’s not okay to add the RSS feed automatically as content on a blog or other website.

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