Archive of ‘Monograms’ category

Multi-Needle Monday: Text Tools at Your Fingertips

 

One of my favorite features about my multi-needle machine (Enterprise or Entrepreneur) is the touch screen text tools. As an embroidery business owner I wear a lot of hats; marketing, finance, designer, and operator so if I can save a little time to stitch a name on a hat back or the sleeve of a coaches shirt I am elated. Using the programmed fonts and editing tools to accomplish this task makes professional looking lettering at your fingertips.

Convert horizontal text into vertical text.

There are a handful of occasions when a vertical name is needed such as: bat bags, locker bags and a length of a sleeve. This is how I create the vertical text on my 10 needle embroidery machine.

 

Step1. Select the lettering icon on the main screen and type in the word “Coach”. Generally the vertical name or word would be all caps.

Select the Array icon and diagonal choice.

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Step2.Select and hold the lower bottom bold diagonal line. The letters will move from a diagonal into a perfect vertical line. Touch close and embroider the text. Size and spacing can still be adjusted as needed.

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Array Text

Select the horizontal line icon and the arch icon. There are many different ways to position the text with the array keys. The arch feature is the perfect tool to use if you add a name to the back of a baseball hat. You can easily squeeze the letters to fit around the opening.

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Slice Tool

This feature separates each letter in a line of text.

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Type in the name or text needed and select “Spacing” icon. Touch the picture of a knife and you will notice the knife moving between each letter in the word.

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Use the “select” key to highlight a letter to be re-sized or moved if needed. Touch edit end and embroider the text.

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Learn more helpful machine embroidery business information by taking my Craftsy class : How to Start an Embroidery Business by Marie Zinno.

Click the link to save $10 on this class.

https://www.craftsy.com/ext/MarieZinno_4963_D


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Multi-Needle Monday: Automatic Appliqué on the Brother Entrepreneur and Baby Lock Enterprise

As owners of the Baby Lock Enterprise and Brother Entrepreneur, we are so fortunate to have the latest and greatest technology at their finger tips. We have the scanner and live camera along with automatic basting file (shown in an earlier blog for embroidering t-shirts) and another helpful, quick technique the automatic appliqué feature. The automatic appliqué can create any shape, text or embroidery design into an appliqué without using embroidery software. There is an icon on the screen to convert each design into an appliqué.

I created a simple three-letter monogram inside a diamond shape design right at the embroidery screen; no embroidery software needed. The steps below will guide you how to create your own appliqué once a design, text or shape is shown on the screen.

Step 1. Select the shapes icon under Exclusives and choose the diamond shape.

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Resize the diamond shape to approximately 4″ wide or the size you wish to embroider and select Edit End. diamond mono3

Step 2. Click the blue shield icon; this will add the automatic appliqué around the diamond shape.

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Step 3.Use the select key and highlight the black diamond shape as shown in photo (the original shape) and delete it.

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Go to “Add”. Choose the monogram icon.

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Step 4. Select the letters for the monogram; left, middle and right letters to fit properly inside the shape.

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Resize the letters to fit inside the satin stitches.

Step 5. Hoop the fabric and stitch the placement color (1st color). Add the fabric on top of placement color. diamond mono13diamond mono14diamond mono15 Remove hoop from machine and trim excess fabric from around diamond shape.

Step 6. Replace the hoop on the machine and stitch the satin stitch and monogram. diamond mono16

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Instant applique! Right at your fingertips!

 

Learn more helpful machine embroidery business information by taking my Craftsy class : How to Start an Embroidery Business by Marie Zinno.

Click the link to save $10 on this class.

https://www.craftsy.com/ext/MarieZinno_4963_D


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Monogram of the Month – A tribute to a friend

How do you cope with the end of life of a dear friend?  It’s never easy – especially when life seems to have been cut way too short.  Whether you’re an embroiderer, sewer, crafter or other form of artist you have an opportunity to use your skills to create something special to honor the deceased’s memory.  This month I decided to create a special monogram with a friend in mind.  She passed away at the young age of 30 from ovarian cancer.

I enjoy the challenge of learning new software—so I chose to work with Art and Stitch 3.0 software.  I was delighted with the built-in designs and features—plus the program is very intuitive.

Open the program, then select File / New.  In the dropdown menu I chose Embroidery for the type of design and chose PES format.

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I clicked on the Monogram Tools button and discovered a library of monogram styles to choose from.  Keeping my friend in mind, I chose the Pioneer Monogram.  The ribbon and flowers reminded me of her.  I typed my friend’s initials in the letters box.

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Although it’s Monogram of the Month—I didn’t want to stop with a monogram.  I want more text and the opportunity to use more features in the software.  Art and Stitch has a fun feature—adding text on a circle path.  I typed “Loving daughter” in the upper portion of the circle then added “and friend” in the lower portion of the circle.  While I could probably write pages of text, I figured those two phrases would cover most everything not only for her family but for people lucky enough to have known her.

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I saved the design and sent it to the embroidery machine.

Depending on your work habits you could have chosen the thread colors in the software then saved the design.  I usually don’t know what colors I want to use until I have ALL the “crayons” in front of me.  Once in my sewing studio I selected thread colors that I thought would not only coordinate well but would celebrate Alana’s life.  This is also when the creative process really did turn into a process!

First I grabbed some blue fabric.  I liked the “almost” denim look and thought it would be perfect to stitch the monogram.  But when it came time to select thread colors I realized the challenge of making sure the embroidery popped against the now not-so-nice blue fabric.  The thread colors don’t merely need to be bright—they need to be attractive and coordinate.  Not to mention they need to be colors my friend would have liked.  That is a daunting task!

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The blue sample above just didn’t work.  What was I thinking when I stitched teal ribbons next to the green leaves?  The colors don’t work well together.  On the bright side, I did like the red thread.

Undaunted, I tried again.  This time I switched to white fabric.

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Now, before you scoff at this sample, let me explain my logic at the time.  The leaves needed to be green.  The red worked in the previous sample—so surely they’d work for the ribbons.  But as I stitched I realized the sample was turning into Christmas with the red and green.  So I thought I’d balance things out with the stark black thread for the initials – then a dash of teal for the lettering.  I almost didn’t finish stitching this sample.  It wasn’t my best color selection!

After the first two samples I decided to regroup.  I focused on my friend’s favorite color:  emerald green.  I selected a pretty emerald green thread—and let it lead the way as I chose the rest of the colors.  The rose and golden yellow coordinated well.  I really wanted to incorporate teal—the color for ovarian cancer awareness.  So I chose a darker version of the color than I had been using.  Confidently, I stitched the sample and well, I think the results speak for themselves!

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There is a lesson in this blog.  Maybe a couple lessons if we look hard enough!

  1. Select one color and build around it.
  2. Be open to experimenting with different thread color combinations.  If you don’t get it right the first time, it doesn’t mean you won’t get it on the next attempt!
  3. Every stitch-out is an opportunity to learn!

Now that it’s stitched it’s ready to be framed and given to Alana’s family.

 

Here’s your assignment this week:What thread color combinations would you have chosen for the monogram?  One random comment will win a $25 gift certificate to the Designs in Machine Embroidery website.
The winner of last week’s assignment answered the following question:
I’m sure you’ve come across the empty bobbin message. What do you do to avoid this? Wind several bobbins? Purchase pre-wound? Throw away almost empty bobbins? Or just bear with it? A random comment will be selected to win a pack of Print & Stick Target Paper!The winner is: Karen M.  – “Empty bobbins are not fun! I try to always keep at least 6 bobbins ready to go simply because I dread the task!”  

 

 

 

 


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Multi-Needle Monday! Roulette Table Cover!

If you are using your multi-needle embroidery machine for a hobby or as a business, I’m sure you have some interesting and unique requests. Through my ten years as a commercial embroidery business owner I have had my share—believe me!

Recently one of the interior decorators that I embroider for asked me to meet their client who had remodeled his living room into a small casino room. The man was widowed and decided to change his formal living room (which he never sat in during his 25 years in the home) into a real casino room; complete with a regulation size roulette table!

The roulette table has an unusual shape and the table cover was customized to fit in one direction. One end of the table is narrower than the opposite end; therefore after playing and replacing the table cover (which is 15 feet long) it was difficult to know which end would fit properly. The client suggested I embroider a monogram on the one end of the cover and then he could easily tell how to replace it on the table.  Easy enough!

Yikes….the table cost thousands of dollars and the custom cover was hundreds as well. The fabric was a medium weight vinyl and he wanted a six inch tall monogram in gold metallic thread. We decided on the font (Old English) and placement which I carefully marked with masking tape while still on the roulette table. I also took photographs with my phone so I could easily envision the layout when I returned to my workroom.

Steps to success:

  1. I used PAL2 to precisely plan the embroidery layout. In my workroom, I placed the cover on the floor and attached the PAL2 to a small table at one end. I used masking tape (not painters tape because it would not stick to the vinyl) I did not want to use pins or chalk. I measured the distance from the edge seam; which we decided while on location and checked for accuracy.
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  2. The best hoop for this heavy fabric was the 8”x 8” Snap Hoop Monster. I was concerned about marks from the frame so I placed foam wrap on the bottom of the frame on top of the magnets.Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog Eileen's Machine Embroidery BlogI used medium weight cut away stabilizer.   I attached the hoop to the machine and placed the bulk of the table cover on a chair to ease the movement of the hoop.
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  1. The metallic thread was placed on my counter, not on the spool rack, in a small mesh container I use for other notions. I have read many different tricks to working with metallic thread but this trick works for me 99% of the time. (Wish I had those odds when playing on a roulette table!)Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog
  2. I slowed the speed of the embroidery machine down to 700rpm and embroidered the monogram without a hitch!Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

As a business owner, it is not wise to play “embroidery roulette” on such custom items because of the risks involved.  This is no time to “learn” or “experiment” on the job – the costs are very high.  I try to steer clear of embroidering on items that I do not supply but I was confident that I had the most amazing tools, embroidery technology and experience.  When you’re in a similar situation consider your experience and the risks involved.

My client was thrilled when we placed the cover on the table and he now enjoys taking the cover off and replacing.

 


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Monogram of the Month – January 2015

Create a monogram for Nancy Zieman? The stress mounted as I thought about the assignment. I opened EmbroideryWorks™ software and started experimenting.

There’s a unique quality about Nancy Zieman’s initials that I hadn’t considered. Rotate the N and it becomes a Z. Rotate the Z and it’s an N.

I started out with the N and rotated it to create a Z.

Then I started playing with angles. I like the idea of being able to read NZ horizontally and vertically. When I think of Nancy, I think of her beautiful landscape quilts. I added some greenery to the design. This is a built-in design with the software!

When I consider Nancy’s qualities, I think of elegance. The addition of the dots reminds me of pearls and when stitched on pale pink linen it completes the look.

See the letters in a new perspective. Try rotating or mirror imaging the letters to see what happens. Consider the recipient. What embroidery font style suits their personality best? Are there additional design elements that can be added to enhance the design?

I was having so much fun with repetition and pattern, I decided to make a border with Nancy’s initials. I am rather pleased that you can still read her initials horizontally and vertically. The use of the triangles separates the letters and also directs the eyes.

Now you give it a try! Select some initials to work with, open your favorite embroidery software and have fun!

Here’s your assignment this week:
Experimenting with monograms can be fun and rewarding. Share with us one time a monogram you made didn’t turn out quite as planned. Maybe the set of linens to the newlyweds Adam and Stacy Smith wasn’t quite what you envisioned or perhaps your kitchen towels to Mom turned out with a real WOW factor. Whatever the case we’d love to hear about it. One random correct answer will be chosen and will receive a $100 gift certificate to use at the Sewphisticated Stitcher website. Good Luck!
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The winner of last week’s assignment:
It’s a puzzle! How many squares are in the picture below? Leave a comment below with your answer. One random correct answer will be chosen and will receive a $25 gift certificate to the DIME website. Good Luck!
msGlpAnd the winner is…Sue Y. “40” Congratulations Sue – there are indeed 40 squares!

 


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My Most Rewarding Embroidery Task

J5Yesterday, I had the honor of embroidering my daughter’s white coat for her graduation ceremony at University of Texas, Pan American. Janelle has completed her Master’s degree and will be a certified Physician’s Assistant.

It’s been a long journey. Her path included several semesters spent in a cadaver lab during her undergraduate studies where her passion for medicine was ignited. That was followed by intense study to pass the GREs. Sweating out the application process (50 available seats for 1000 applicants) and then waiting for the acceptance letter.  The jubilation that her goals were within reach pushed her into the next phase: twenty-seven months immersed in medical studies – orthopedics, cardiology, obstetrics, gynecology, internal and pediatrics. Testing, testing, testing and finally, clinical rotations in the field. Last week, she passed her final exams with flying colors. Today, she graduates and will wear her white coat – monogrammed by her mom.

My life is a whirlwind often swirling so fast it’s hard to catch my breath. On Wednesday, Janelle brought me the white coat, fresh out of the shipping bag and asked me to embroider her name and credentials above the left pocket. She was kind enough to write it out for me first (and smart enough – maybe because she remembered just a few months ago when I embroidered linens for her friend’s wedding gift with the bride’s maiden initials! They look just great on my bed now). She dropped the coat (and her significant other’s) in my office and we went on to other tasks.

The next day, I looked at the pristine coat, tags still attached and thought about how hard it was to earn that coat. The sacrifices she made along the way and the sacrifices I made to get her through undergraduate school at the University of Oklahoma. As a single mom, I was determined to see both of my children graduate with a bachelor’s degree. It wasn’t easy but they both have succeeded.

Janelle did graduate school on her own and is now empowered to enjoy a career she loves. If she’s as lucky as me, she’ll never work a day in her life because she’ll love what she’s doing.

So, it was with great honor that I opened Perfect Embroidery Pro and clicked on the Text icon. I typed in Janelle Roche….in the properties box and scrolled through the fonts to the mini fonts.J7

 

I selected the Diana font and hit Apply.j1

Suddenly, there it was on the screen – all those years of preparation. I couldn’t wait to see it stitched.

I measured the pocket – 5” wide and adjusted the size of the text. I hooped tear-away stabilizer and similar fabric and stitched a test. Perfect!

I placed a target ruler above the pocket and inserted a target sticker into the hole. J3

I hooped the coat with tear-away stabilizer in Snap Hoop Monster, centered the needle over the sticker and pressed start. I have to confess, I stayed with the machine and watched it stitched every letter. I didn’t really relax until the machine stopped. Those mini-fonts in Perfect Embroidery Pro are perfect!J4

After clipping the thread tails and removing the stabilizer, I fingered the white cloth and experienced a little déjà vu remembering another white coat – her baptismal gown. Oh, how time flies.

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Janelle and Kegan Milstead Graduation Day University of Texas, Pan Am, 2014


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It’s Sew Easy TV: Monograms for Men

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On October 10, log onto http://www.ItsSewEasyTV.com and watch me show you how to make any men’s garment distinctive and personal by adding a monogram in episode 703.  The key work is discretion to assure great results. I’ll discuss the variety of types and shapes available for monograming, and show how to perfectly position the garment in the hoop before you start to embroider.  Then, I’ll create the monogram on the screen of the Quattro® 3 NV6750D by selecting the font from the built-in lettering and resizing and moving the letters.  Check out how to use the snowman sticker to assure the pocket flap is perfectly positioned.

Materials

If there’s one word to describe monogramming on menswear, it’s discreet; discreet in size and contrast. Now don’t go by my samples – my samples are done for photography – highly contrasting so you can see them well on camera. But when stitched for someone to actually wear, a discreet monogram is the one most gentlemen will be comfortable wearing. You have several choices when it comes to placing the monogram. Some very popular choices are on the pocket, above the pocket, or on the pocket flap if there is one, on the left cuff, inside the placket between the second and third button or on the placket at the bottom, just below the last button on the top placket and just for identification purposes: inside the collar. ill There are countless ways to arrange the letters but I’ve focused on three versions of the three-letter monogram. The traditional diamond shape: first name initial, last name initial and middle name initial. The two outer letters are proportionally smaller than the middle letter. Diamond The standard order: first, middle and last initial – all the same size. Standard On the pocket flap, go for a contemporary approach with the first initial stacked over the middle initial. This ‘tower’ of letters is equal in size to the last initial. Take this approach when the garment is a casual shirt like flannel, worn every day. Contemp Let’s take a look at how you do it.

Pocket Flap

Find the vertical center of the flap. Place a target sticker just right of the edge of the flap. Hoop sticky stabilizer and place the hoop under the Perfect Alignment Laser. Turn on the laser and center the hoop under the laser. Position the flap on the sticky stabilizer. Smooth the flap on the stabilizer making sure the shirt is not caught under the flap. Flap1 Support the weight of the shirt while transporting the hoop to the machine. Attach the hoop on the machine and verify the needle is centered over the target sticker. Remove the sticker and embroider the monogram.

Cuff

Button the left cuff and place it on a flat surface. Cuff2 Place the Perfect Placement Kit Cuff template on the cuff, aligning the fold with the template fold line and the topstitching line with the topstitching. Slide a target sticker under the template – use A for sizes small and medium and B for Large and extra-large. Cuff Unbutton the sleeve and pull the sleeve inside out. Hoop adhesive stabilizer and center the hoop under the Perfect Alignment Laser. Slide the cuff under the beam, aligning the crosshairs. Attach the hoop to the machine and embroider the monogram. These small precise monograms take under three minutes to stitch – you could do a whole closetful in an afternoon!

Here’s your assignment this week:

What is your most prized monogram project? Tell us your favorite and one comment will be chosen to receive a $25 gift certificate to spend on the DIME website. Thank you for reading and good luck!

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The winner of last week’s assignment is:

What foot do you have that you wish you knew how to use?  Post a comment to let us know! One comment will be chosen at random to receive a $25 shopping spree on the Designs in Machine Embroidery website!

And the winners is..Barbara. “Gee, I wish I knew where to start! Between my sewing machine and serger, there are so many adventures afoot that I can’t begin to choose! How about the ones that came with the last update?”


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Monogram of the Month – September

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When you select a font for monogramming do you consider how it was made? As you watch the letters stitch on your machine, do you wonder why the needle travels here, there and finally back here? And if you’re like me, you are impressed with the final outcome.

What a sense of satisfaction seeing a beautifully stitched monogram completed on the hooped fabric. Often, I pat myself on the back for the selection of the font, the stabilizer, fabric and thread. In reality, it has very little to do with my selections. The beauty is in the actual letters. After all, they are much more than a mere A, B or C. They are works of art. And my art – my stitched monogram – would not be so impressive if it weren’t for the digitizer’s fine-tuned attention to detail.

SNF: Romanesque Monogram Set 7 and Gothic Monogram Set 9

SNF: Romanesque Monogram Set 7 and Gothic Monogram Set 9

My hat goes off to the font digitizers who have devoted their life’s work to producing professional embroidery designs. They shun the auto-digitizing functions in their software and they place every stitch in every letter of every font (you do the math!) with the user in mind. How will this font be used? What type of fabric will it be stitched on? Other technical questions include the consideration of underlay, column width and specialty effects. The digitizer’s goal is to always set the user up for success without adding unnecessary stitches that result in heavy designs and wasted time and materials.

H: Flourishes Monogram Set and Arabesque Monogram Set 13

H: Flourishes Monogram Set and Arabesque Monogram Set 13

This commitment gives us, the embroiderer, confidence to get creative with fonts. When we know the letters will stitch beautifully, we are free to incorporate several styles in a monogram. Add a splash of color and elegant accents for a customized, personal monogram.

AW: Moderne XL Monogram Set 5 and Flourishes Monogram Set 1

AW: Moderne XL Monogram Set 5 and Flourishes Monogram Set 1

In celebration of a lifetime of devotion to detail, EmbroideryArts.com is offering Designs in Machine Embroidery readers a $10.00 coupon off any online purchase until October 15, 2014. When you browse their library – now at an impressive 200 fonts – I’m sure you’ll find good use for that $10.00 savings. Choose any product or products with a total value of $ 10.00 or more and add the product(s) to your shopping cart. On the shopping cart page, enter coupon code DIME200 in the coupon code field and click “Apply” before completing your order.

*Coupon has no cash value.

 

Here’s your assignment this week:
After you’ve taken advantage of the great deal from EmbroideryArts.com leave a comment below about the three most used items in your sewing room. One blog reader will be selected to receive a $25 gift certificate for use on the DiME website. Thanks and good luck!
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The winner of last week assignment:
September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness month. Throughout the month we will feature a Tapestry of Life Quilt project created for a young woman recently diagnosed with ovarian cancer. What have you created with your embroidery or sewing machine to support and comfort a friend or loved one faced with cancer? For each unique user comment below we will donate $1 to the Be The Difference Foundation, up to $820! Thank you for your support and don’t forget to come back for our Tapestry of Life Quilt project.
Tapestry-of-Life-Quilt_logoAnd the winner is the Be The Difference Foundation! Thank you for your comments in support of this wonderful organization. 

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Monogram of the Month – August

As you build your library of embroidery fonts, consider a basic applique font.  Not too fancy, not to juvenile, not too feminine, not too masculine, well you get the idea. A basic applique font is helpful to have on hand as you’ll find many uses for this type of font.  Upper case letters will do the trick for most of your monogram needs but having access to multiple sizes is a bonus.  The Punky Monkey from Five Star Fonts includes five sizes:  2 ½”; 3 ¾”; 4 ¾”; 5 ¾” and 6 ¾” PLUS numbers zero through nine.  The font should really be called Chunky Monkey because the letters are chunky – allowing for generous fabric exposure.

I liked the generous underlay behind the satin stitches because that tells me these stitches will stand up against terry cloth and faux fur – two popular fabrics for monogrammed items.

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Whenever I create an applique that has a small opening in the center such as the letter R or B, I precut the applique. Precutting appliques saves so much time because it eliminates trimming in the hoop. I hoop the applique fabric and stitch color 1 of the applique design and then remove the fabric from the hoop. I trim just outside of the stitch line and set it aside.   Next I hoop the base fabric and stitch color 1, the placement guide.

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Then I spray the wrong side of the precut applique with temporary adhesive and place it over the outline.  The next color tacks down the applique.

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The final colors complete the decorative elements. The extra (and optional) line of bean stitches running right down the center of the satin stitches adds an interesting detail and elevates this simple font.

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Our resident photographer, Pedro, really likes the extra bean stitch detail…

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These letters are the perfect addition to a variety of projects!
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If you like to mix and match sizes as I’ve done here, then you’ll enjoy the simplicity of merging these pre-sized designs into the screen.  To create this contemporary monogram, I used the 2 ½” extra small letters for the T (first name initial) and R (middle name initial) and the 5 ¾” large letter for the B (last name initial).  Order and size of monogram letters are two elements that can be changed to avoid monograms that become words or acronyms like LSD, SOS and PMS.  You can’t change someone’s name but you can get creative in the way you display the letters.  The next time you’re confronted with a tricky letter combination consider using this unconventional approach to letter arrangement.

 

 

Here’s your assignment this week:
Tell me your favorite applique font from Five Star Fonts and you could win a copy of Machine Embroidered Monograms for the Home.Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog
The winners of last week’s assignment completed the Facebook task of liking our page.  Congratulations to Lore E and Margarita!  You’ll both receive a copy of Handbags 2 Designer Knockoffs.
Have you liked our page yet on Facebook?  Go ahead, give us a click.  CLICK HERE 

 

 


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Monogram of the Month: A Reason to Celebrate!

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I was very excited when Eileen gave me the opportunity to write this month’s Monogram of the Month feature.  I’ve had my eye on the banner designs from JoAnn Connolly’s book, Sweet Stitchesand decided instead of monograms today I’d do a fun banner.   I’m quite fond of quick and easy projects that require minimal effort but create lots of joy while I stitch.  And these designs fit my requirements to the letter!  (Pun intended!)

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I wanted to make something special for my friend, Jean, who will be celebrating her 95th birthday.  Friends and family are gathering this 4th of July weekend to celebrate her day.  I decided to make a festive banner to mark the occasion—plus it would make a great backdrop to take photos of her with her family.  Great memories everyone can cherish!

Fabric

Like most of our readers, I like fabric and I eagerly sign up for any excuse to buy more, more, more!  But this time, I decided I’d challenge myself—really test my nouveau designer skills and gasp… use what I already have!

I rummaged through my containers of fabric – I was certain I had nothing!  Nothing!  But wait… that polka dot fabric is kinda cute.  Actually, it’s very cute.  So cute, I haven’t used it because I wanted to use it for something special.  It was a small remnant I purchased over a decade ago from Hancock Fabrics.  It’s perfect.  Once I found the main fabric it was easy to add other coordinating fabrics.

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Designs

My next challenge was figuring out what combination of letters to use.  “Happy Birthday” is an obvious choice.  But I decided to go with something more universal—and that can work all year long—“Celebrate”.  After all, life should be a celebration—especially when you have lived 95 years!

Sweet Stitches comes with an accompanying CD.  I transferred the letters to spell “Celebrate” to a USB stick for my embroidery machine.  Then I stitched the designs.

Denise Tips:

  • Be sure to keep the book handy!  The photos and step-by-step instructions will guide you along the way.  Initially I thought I didn’t need to read the steps—I like a challenge.  But after stitching a few samples I decided I’d go ahead and read the steps.  Surprise, surprise!  Following the steps made the process much simpler.
  • JoAnn has a reason for suggesting you use Temporary Spray Adhesive when working with applique fabrics.  If you don’t… you might end up with puckers!  Oops!A Reason to Celebrate!
  • Applique scissors are especially useful when trimming.
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  • If you place white on top of a busy fabric, be aware of the possibility of fabric show-through.  My first ‘careless’ attempt to solve this problem was to place a second layer of white fabric.  But the fabric I was using was very heavy—so when it came time to trim the two layers of white fabric, it wasn’t an easy or flawless task.  Argh!
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    My second attempt was much better.  I used a layer of stabilizer underneath the white fabric.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

  • Mix & Mingle… and have fun!  Don’t feel like every letter has to be the same color.  Mix and match.  That’s what makes the process fun.  Plus this gives you a chance to use small fabric scraps.

 

Here’s a look at the finished banner!  I look forward to decorating for Jean’s birthday and creating fun memories! Imagine the banners you can make for someone special!  Give it a try.

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

 

 

Here’s your assignment this week:What decorations have you made over the years to celebrate someone’s special day?  Post a comment for a chance to win a $25 shopping spree to the Designs in Machine Embroidery website.Gift-Card
The winner of last week’s assignment answered the following question:

Do you have a versatile design you use over and over on different types of projects? Post your comment for a chance to win a copy of Calligraphy Project Designer.

 

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And the winner is… Alicia Key 
“I have several designs I enjoy but after a few kitchen towels of them I’m ready to try a new design. I’ve just recently joined your email list & I’m looking forward to more of your ideas for creativity! I like the Embroidery Library design that Colleen Bell mentioned above & while checking that out, I found some more that I like. I also like Andrea Henke’s suggestion of the glow-in-the-dark eyes on pillow cases! I’ll have to find some of that thread! I would LOVE a chance to win the Calligraphy files.”

Congratulations, Alicia.  Sounds like you’ll be very busy with all sorts of projects!

 

 

 


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